ENGR-233: Dynamics

School
Science, Technology, Engineering & Math
Department
Engineering
Academic Level
Undergraduate
Course Subject
Engineering
Course Number
233
Course Title
Dynamics
Credit Hours
3.00
Instructor Contact Hours Per Semester
62.00 (for 15-week classes)
Student Contact Hours Per Semester
62.00 (for 15-week classes)
Grading Method
A-E
Pre-requisites
ENGR-232 with a C grade or better, or PHYS-231 with a C grade or better
Catalog Course Description

Basic concepts and principles of dynamics with application of Newton's Laws of Motion to engineering problems. Kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Equations of motion, impulse-momentum, impact and work-energy principles.

Goals, Topics, and Objectives

Core Course Topics
  1. Kinematics of particles
    • To introduce the concepts of position, displacement, velocity, and acceleration.
    • To investigate particle motion along a straight line and a curved path.
    • To present an analysis of dependent motion of two particles.
    • To examine the principles of relative motion of two particles using translating axes.
  2. Kinetics of particles: Newton’s second law
    • To analyze the accelerated motion of a particle using the equation of motion with different coordinate systems.
    • To investigate central-force motion and apply it to problems in space mechanics.
  3. Kinetics of particles: Work and Energy
    • To develop the principle of work and energy and apply it to solve problems that involve force, velocity, and displacement.
    • To introduce the concept of a conservative force and apply the theorem of conservation of energy to solve kinetic problems.
  4. Kinetics of particles: Impulse and Momentum
    • To develop the principle of linear impulse and momentum for a particle and apply it to solve problems that involve force, velocity, and time.
    • To study the conservation of linear momentum for particles.
    • To introduce the concept of angular impulse and momentum.
  5. Kinematics of rigid bodies
    • To classify the various types of rigid-body planar motion.
    • To investigate rigid-body translation and angular motion about a fixed axis.
    • To study planar motion using an absolute motion analysis.
    • To provide a relative motion analysis of velocity and acceleration.
    • To show how to find the instantaneous center of zero velocity and determine the velocity of a point on a body using this method.
  6. Kinetics of rigid bodies: Forces and Accelerations
    • To introduce the methods used to determine the mass moment of inertia of a body.
    • To develop the planar kinetic equations of motion for a symmetric rigid body.
    • To discuss applications of these equations to bodies undergoing translation, rotation about a fixed axis, and general plane motion.
  7. Kinetics of rigid bodies: Work and Energy
    • To develop formulations for the kinetic energy of a body, and define the various ways a force and couple do work.
    • To apply the principle of work and energy to solve rigid-body planar kinetic problems that involve force, velocity, and displacement.
    • To show how the conservation of energy can be used to solve rigid-body planar kinetic problems.
  8. Kinetics of rigid bodies: Impulse and Momentum
    • To develop formulations for the linear and angular momentum of a body.
    • To apply the principles of linear and angular impulse and momentum to solve rigid-body planar kinetic problems that involve force, velocity, and time.
    • To discuss application of the conservation of momentum.
    • To analyze the mechanics of eccentric impact.

Assessment and Requirements

Assessment of Academic Achievement

Assessment will be conducted as follows:

  1. Problem solving skills will be assessed in the classroom by the instructor as each student is guided in the assembly of information and strategies for its analysis and interpretation; and later as each submitted homework problem set is read.
  2. Cognitive skills will be assessed by the instructor as homework problem sets submitted by each student are read to see how the student has connect their method of solution with possible physical relationships suggested during lecture.
  3. Critical thinking skills will be assessed by the instructor during numerous problem sessions with the entire class, in which each student presents solutions to problems assigned in advance on the blackboard, while the instructor circulates about the classroom engaging students in discussion about various strategies involved in solving the problem under consideration. Later evaluation of related assigned homework problems, quizzes, and tests, allow the instructor to verify such assessment.
  4. Communication skills will be assessed by the instructor while interacting with students in the classroom, with follow-up questions during oral presentations on the blackboard, and with written comments made on submitted homework problem sets.

Outcomes

General Education Categories
  • Natural Sciences
Institutional Outcomes
  • Scientific Reasoning
MTA Categories
  • Category 6.1: Natural Sciences

Approval Dates

Effective Term
Fall 2019
ILT Approval Date
11/26/2018
AALC Approval Date
12/19/2018
Curriculum Committee Approval Date
01/16/2019