HIST-248: Coming to the New World: American Ethnic and Immigration History from First Nations to the Present

School
Liberal Arts
Department
History
Academic Level
Undergraduate
Course Subject
History
Course Number
248
Course Title
Coming to the New World: American Ethnic and Immigration History from First Nations to the Present
Credit Hours
3.00
Instructor Contact Hours Per Semester
47.00 (for 15-week classes)
Student Contact Hours Per Semester
47.00 (for 15-week classes)
Grading Method
A-E
Pre-requisites
ENG-081/093 eligible
Catalog Course Description

Traces the history of immigrants to North America and the United States from before Columbus to the present. Focuses on issues of cultural contact and conflict in American society, and issues of immigrant assimilation and acceptance into mainstream American cultures.

Goals, Topics, and Objectives

Core Course Topics
  1. First Nations and the Creation of Indian America
  2. Colonial America and the Mixing of Cultures
  3. Immigrants and the New Republic
  4. Immigrants and Frontier Expansion
  5. Industrialization, Immigration, and the Creation of Modern America
  6. Racial-Ethnic Issues in Modern American Immigration
  7. Immigration in the Era of American Global Power
  8. Immigration and Post-Industrial Globalized America
Core Course Learning Objectives (Separated)

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
1. Outline time and chronology in American Ethnic and Immigration History.
2. Identify, summarize, and analyze major elements of American Ethnic and Immigration History.
3. Analyze cause and effect in American Ethnic and Immigration History.
4. Trace elements of change and continuity in American Ethnic and Immigration History.
5. Emphasize parallelism by describing the impact of major events, personalities, and places upon American Ethnic and Immigration History.

Detailed Learning Objectives (Optional)

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
1. Explain the Origin of the First Nations and the Creation of Indian America.
2. Analyze the Creation of Colonial America and the Mixing of Cultures.
3. Identify the Role of Immigrants in the New Republic.
4. Explain the Role of Immigrants in Frontier Expansion.
5. Analyze Industrialization, Immigration, and the Creation of Modern America.
6. Explain Racial and Ethnic Issues as Aspects of Modern American Immigration.
7. Analyze the Role of Immigration in the Era of American Global Power.
8. Explain the Major Aspects of Immigration in Post-Industrial Globalized America.

Assessment and Requirements

Assessment of Academic Achievement

Assessment of academic achievement will be identified and implemented by the class instructor. Methods will include, but will not be limited to, individual projects, vocabulary, class participation (discussion and critiques), and tests.

Texts

These texts are only suggestions. Individual instructors may choose different texts.

  • Gerde, Jon, ed., Major Problems in American Immigration and Ethnic History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. ISBN: 0-395-81532-0.
  • Nash, Gary. Red, White, & Black:The Peoples of Early North America, 4th Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2000. ISBN: 0-13-956756-9.
  • Dinnerstein, Leonard, et. al, Natives and Strangers: A Multicultural History Americans. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. ISBN: 0-19-509084-5.

Outcomes

General Education Categories
  • Social Sciences
  • Humanities and Fine Arts
Institutional Outcomes
  • Civil Society and Culture - U.S. and Global
MTA Categories
  • Category 4: Social Sciences
  • Category 5: Humanities and Fine Arts
Satisfies Wellness Requirement
No

Approval Dates

Effective Term
Fall 2020
ILT Approval Date
04/12/2019
AALC Approval Date
04/17/2019
Curriculum Committee Approval Date
05/13/2019